WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GROW UP?

When I was at school and university, I was asked on a number of occasions by careers guidance counsellors: “What do you want to be when you’re older?” and “Where do you see yourself in five years time?”

Whilst some of my peers were able to provide a concrete plan of their values, goals and dreams, I often found myself unable to answer. Well, provide an answer that the counsellor at the time wanted to hear.

I didn’t know.

The result of this uncertainty and confusion about my life led me to generally provide a monosyllabic response, to which I would be handed a heavy tome containing details of possible careers to review in my own time. This was before the days of internet searches for information. Even my UCAS application was in paper form.

I wasn’t trying to be impertinent with what were well-meaning counsellors, but I genuinely had no clue what I wanted to do. Even my subject choices at A-Level and for my undergraduate degree were things I didn’t give enough thought to. In hindsight, I can see that particularly for my degree, I was more concerned with what others thought was best for me or what I thought others would think was best for me, rather than considering if it would be something I would enjoy or matched what I valued at the time. Wonderful friends and the other opportunities of studying for my degree aside, I still to this day regret my degree choice.

As I got older, the pressure of having a clear plan became ever more significant. When I was nearing graduation I knew that I would need something to do, something to be aiming for. My parents, although amazing, weren’t simply going to fund me whilst I still evaluated my future.

So I turned to teaching.

I am wincing slightly as I write that, as though teaching is a safe and easy option as it most certainly isn’t! However, having family members who were teachers and growing up in an environment that placed a high level of importance on the value of education, I wondered if it could be a career option for me.

So I set myself the goal of becoming a teacher. And a year or so later, I graduated and was preparing for my first teaching position.

Of course I have made it sound terribly simplistic and I am clearly choosing to ignore and/or repress some of the challenges that I experienced on the way (like the student in one placement school who would constantly comment on my figure or the teacher who wouldn’t support me when I complained about said student for instance). I wanted to give up, many times and despite my feelings about my role and the education system now, I am glad that I persevered. I have largely loved teaching the subjects that I teach, enjoyed the camaraderie of the teaching staff and I have worked with some truly remarkable young people who I will never forget.

To that end, having received some positive feedback from the school where I interviewed a few weeks ago it made me realise that whatever happens next in my career or even in five years, whether I remain in education or not, I will always have a bucketload of experience and stories to share. 

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